• Sports
    Bleacher Report

    Eagles Rumors: Jalen Hurts to Get More Playing Time Amid Carson Wentz Struggles

    The Philadelphia Eagles could be gearing up for a change at quarterback. Ian Rapoport of NFL Network reported Jalen Hurts is set for an "increased" role in Monday's game against the Seattle Seahawks ...

  • Sports
    Bleacher Report

    Chuck Wants Dirt on Steph 😂

    Barkley really called Dell and Seth to get an edge ahead of Capital One's The Match 🎥

  • World
    The Telegraph

    Iran nuclear scientist assassination timing raises questions over US involvement

    Iran was swift to blame Israel for the assassination of its top nuclear scientist, Mohsen Fakhrizadeh. Indeed, eliminating targets in their cars is believed to be the hallmark of Israel’s intelligence agency, Mossad, which deployed the tactic on several Iranian nuclear scientists between 2010 and 2012. But the timing of the attack also raises questions about US involvement, coming just weeks after Donald Trump is said to have sought options to strike Iran over its nuclear programme. While reports suggest Mr Trump, who withdrew the US from the 2015 accord that curbed Iran's nuclear activity, was dissuaded from a military strike, this may possibly be one of the alternatives presented to him. The news of Trump seeking military options to strike Iran was followed by reports of American B-52 bombers being sent to the Middle East to “reassure allies” and the Israel Defense Forces being put on high alert in the event of an Iranian retaliation. Around the same time, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu embarked on a historic, albeit “secret”, trip to Saudi Arabia to meet with Saudi Crown Prince Mohamed bin Salman. The surprise meeting represents the hardening anti-Iran alliance in the Middle East that Mr Trump has worked hard to shape during his time in office. It is also, perhaps, a signal to the incoming Joe Biden administration. Mr Biden is currently in the middle of his transition process. If this is Mr Trump's last act to bring Iran into line, it could also be seen as an attempt to sabotage any future diplomacy between the US and Iran. President-elect Biden has already suggested returning to the nuclear deal if Iran promises strict compliance. Iran began breaching aspects of the nuclear accord a year after the US re-imposed punitive sanctions on the country. Mr Trump on Friday retweeted several reports highlighting the assassination. For many, Mr Fakhrizadeh had the Sword of Damocles hanging over him after being name checked by Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu during a May 2018 presentation on files secretly stolen by Mossad that detailed Iran’s nuclear program. Mr Netanyahu gave Mr Fakhrizadeh a high profile that should have also brought him protection. So the fact that a hit squad could take him out will raise urgent questions about the weakness of Iran’s internal security. While his death is a blow to Iran’s nuclear ambitions, they doesn’t hinge on one man. In practical terms, though, this will shake Iran’s internal security establishment as now many will be fearing who could be next. This assassination comes just days after Iran engaged in a prisoner swap for three Iranians who were part of a foiled plot to assassinate Israeli diplomats in Bangkok, Thailand in 2012. That plot was in revenge for the series of assassinations of Iranian nuclear scientists around that time. Iran will be expected to retaliate again. The world will be watching closely - as will Mr Biden. Holly Dagres is a fellow at the Washington-based think tank, the Atlantic Council, editor of its IranSource and curator of The Iranist newsletter

  • Sports
    Bleacher Report

    The Match 3 Teaser

    The stars of Capital One's The Match are ready to square up and earn some money for HBCUs today

  • World
    The Telegraph

    Terrorists likely to have been inspired by pandemic to launch biological attacks, leading chemical expert warns

    Terrorists are likely to have been inspired by the pandemic to launch biological attacks, the UK's leading expert on chemical and biological warfare has warned in a new paper. The “devastating global impact” of Covid-19 will have been noticed by rogue states and terror organisations. Hamish de Bretton-Gordon, the former head of Britain’s chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear regiment, has warned of the “very real possibility that in the future, bad actors will try to engineer, steal or obtain a highly transmissible and highly virulent virus and unleash it onto the world”. In an article for the Combating Terrorism Centre in the US, Mr de Bretton-Gordon says advances in synthetic - or man-made - biology have created tools that could be put to “malevolent use”. “We should think of weaponised biology as no less of an existential threat to the planet than weaponised atomic science," he said. “The fear and panic that even a medium-scale bioterror attack could create could have dangerous implications that may rival or even surpass the immediate loss of life. "Toxic industrial chemicals like chlorine have been used for horrific effect in Syria and have kept Assad in power. These readily available and unregulated toxic materials are cheap and plentiful and their effect will not have gone unnoticed by bad actors the world over."

  • Entertainment
    Total Film Magazine

    30 A-list actors whose early roles you've completely forgotten about

    From teen soap operas to Scorsese blockbusters

  • U.S.
    The Telegraph

    Students want the word 'black' banned from textbooks and lectures

    University students have demanded the word "black" be banned from lectures and textbooks amid claims it symbolises "negative situations". Undergraduates at the University of Manchester say the colour's use as an adjective is stemmed in "colonial history", which has become outdated in the wake of the Black Lives Matter movement. Supporters are calling for commonly used phrases such as "black sheep" to be removed from lecture slides and books, while concerns have also been raised about "blackmail" and "black market" during a student union-led audit of racism concerns on campus. The University said it is preparing to roll out new training and research in response to the unease in order to tackle “racist terminology” and “aggressions”. In documents seen by The Telegraph,those studying at the red brick institution called for: “The university to ban the use of these words listed above and any other use of the word ‘black’ as an adjective to express negative connotations.” This is because black is “linguistically and metaphorically associated with negative situations” and “used for bad and unsavoury situations or objects”. This is part of an “accepted consciousness” of using colours as adjectives that is “situated in colonial history”, the student report stated. Students in the university's East African, Sudanese, Nigerian and Natural Hair societies canvassed for the report, claiming terms like “blacklist” and “whitelist” should be barred from any written communications. This ban, they argue, should be imposed on university research papers, lecture slides, and books published by staff. The University of Manchester, part of the elite Russell Group, has said in a report responding to student concerns that it will address language that is “divisive and not inclusive”. A training programme is being developed based on the “findings on everyday aggressions” and “this will include the use of racist terminology”. A spokesperson said: "Racism and discrimination have no place in our University, and all our community of students and staff have a right to expect that they will be treated equally and fairly and can work and study in a safe, secure and fulfilling environment." The Race Matters report states the institution will consult on “appropriate language to ensure we embed inclusive linguistics into our values”. However, the alleged “colonial” or racist etymologies of the common phrases which are to be addressed has been dismissed by experts. Lexicographer Jonathon Green said the phrases were not borne from conscious racism. “An aspect of current identity politics has indeed claimed an etymology that simply wasn't there at the moment of coinage,” he said. The negative connotations of the nursery rhyme staple black sheep may stem from the commercially less valuable wool of these rarer animals. Blackmail is believed to have derived from bandits demanding extortion payments from victims near the Anglo-Scottish boundary between the 13th and 17th centuries.